Expat Craft beer brewer bets on Chinese market

on 16/07/12 at 4:39 pm

Beer

Chandler Jurinka says his goal is to put unique beers in front of China's growing population of microbrew lovers. Photo: Feng Yongbin / China Daily

As the temperature rises, so does the number of people whiling away the hours outside pubs, throwing back cold ones. This is what Chandler Jurinka calls “session drinking”.

“I like to talk and hang out with people who drink our beer,” says the co-founder of Beijing-based Slow Boat Brewery.

Jurinka’s sporty tennis shoes and blue jeans are a sign of his laid-back persona, but he fills his days dashing on his motorbike from one restaurant to another, acting as salesman, event planner, teacher and problem-solver.

The 45-year-old Colorado native says the craft beer’s ingredients, which are imported from Oregon, bring the flavors of the United States to the Middle Kingdom. Before launching the nearly year-old venture, Jurinka invested most of the previous year in researching beer and beer consumption in China.

He learned that in China, consumers certainly have a taste for beer. The industry is the largest in the world by production volume and beer is the best-selling alcohol product in China, according to both US and Chinese agriculture officials.

The US Department of Agriculture reported that exports of US microbrews to China hit $546,000 in 2010, a record, and overall sales quintupled in five years from $91,000 in 2005.

This is not Jurinka’s first time at starting from scratch. Yibian Zhongguo, which means translating around China, was a company Jurinka helped start that provided translated menus for free. The company, bought out nine months after it launched, made money by selling advertisements in the margins.

He has also been involved in the website localnoodles.com, a concept similar to Yelp, where he remains an adviser.

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