And now, Port cocktails! Remember Port?

on 29/02/12 at 8:55 am

Booze News
When I think about port, I think of my earliest, clumsy attempts at seeming — with requisite air quotes — “sophisticated,” or at least “fancy.” Back then, in my 20s, port seemed like the fast track to connoisseurship. “I’ll take a glass of the ’85 Fonseca,” I’d say to a waiter as everyone else was simply ordering dessert.

I admit I was kind of insufferable. But I did grow fond of port, and it did end up being the first wine I truly came to know, from drinking a lot of it as well as making several visits to the famed port lodges in Porto, the Portuguese city from which the wine takes its name. Yet over time, my love for port waned. Like everyone else’s, it seemed.

There are a lot of theories on why port fell out of favor. Sure, it’s seen as the kind of drink that an elderly British gentleman, dressed in tweed, might sip while smoking a pipe; not exactly a contemporary image.

But even that can’t totally explain why fewer and fewer people drink port. This is a time, after all, when other, old-timey fortified wines such as sherry, Madeira or even Tokaji are gaining a new following, promoted by young, hipster sommeliers with tattoos.

“Port sales are flat,” Aymeric de Gironde, sales director for the venerable Quinta do Noval port house, told me when I visited the Douro Valley this past fall.

FULL STORY via Washington Post

 

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