Listen up. How to Bring an Alcoholic Beverage to Market

on 21/01/11 at 11:38 am

Booze News

Hey, home-brew whiz. So you have what it takes to get your intoxicating beverage behind bars and on liquor-store shelves?

Ralph Erenzo was desperate to find a use for his land in the Hudson Valley in New York after some townspeople objected to his plans for a “climbing ranch.” He learned about a change to New York law that created a new class of distillers. Prior to 2003, the only option was a $50,000-a-year industrial distilling license. The new class, designed to give farmers another outlet for their harvest, dropped down to $650. Tuthilltown Spirits was born.

Erenzo and his partner Brian Lee taught themselves to make alcohol by trial and error. Erenzo sold their batches of corn whiskey out of his car, convincing bartenders one-by-one to carry the brand.

Now, the Hudson Valley spirit sells for about $50 for 375 ml, and is carried in some of the nation’s top restaurants including Blue Hill and Per Se, and the company continues to release new products, including rye, rum and vodka.

But for every success story like Tuthilltown Spirits, many entrepreneurs try to bring a new spirit, wine or beer to market and fail. How can you make sure that your drink will get behind bars and on liquor-store shelves?

Bringing an Alcoholic Beverage to Market: Find Your Niche
{Full story via Inc.}

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