Women and whiskey go together, always have

on 21/10/13 at 8:59 am

Booze News

51rqdBp6sbL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Spend much time around bourbon makers and you begin to wonder, where are all the women?

Louisville spirits writer Fred Minnick has the answer: they are there; you just have to look for them.

“Nobody was really studying this,” he said in a recent interview. “I hope it begins a quest to learn more about how important women are to the history of whiskey. Since I’ve filed my manuscript, I’ve found so many more women.”

In his Whiskey Women, The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch and Irish Whiskey, Minnick, left, unearths such beauties as “the Poteen Queen of Scotstown,” the early 20th century Irish equivalent of a bootlegger. And Belle Starr, the “Bandit Queen,” who stole whiskey from whites in Western Arkansas and sold it in Indian Territory.

“I truly believe that women are more important than men when it comes to the history of whiskey,” Minnick told an August gathering of Bourbon Women at the Kentucky Governor’s Mansion in Frankfort. “Sumerian women invented beer. Mesopotamian women invented distillation for perfume. An Egyptian woman created the alembic still and you can still find prototypes of this in Kentucky and Tennessee for moonshining.”