Your brain on booze asks, “What Is alcohol tolerance?”

on 19/03/14 at 2:55 pm

Booze News
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Oh dear

St. Patrick’s Day undeniably owns one of the top spots on any list of the drunkest holidays — and tolerance (or lack there of) may never be so publicly on display.

So why can some people handle their liquor better than others? First, it’s important to define what, exactly, tolerance is. There are two ways of thinking about it, says George F. Koob, Ph.D., the director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Developing tolerance to alcohol — or any drug — means it takes more of that drug to produce the same effect — or, looked at another way, the same amount of the drug produces less of an effect.

Some people are born with the ability to go round for round, showing minimal effects. A growing body of research from the University of California, San Diego among families with history of alcoholism has pinpointed low-sensitivity to alcohol in some people, or what Koob calls inherent tolerance. “These are basically individuals who drink everybody under the table and they’re born that way,” he says. “It’s an intriguing neurobiological question as to why, but it still remains somewhat of a mystery.” Ironically, this low-sensitivity actually seems to make someone more likely to become an alcoholic, he says.

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And:

A study that used data from two archival samples to tested the hypothesis that light-eyed people are more likely to abuse alcohol.

Both samples proved to show that people with light eyes, or blue eyes more specifically, had consumed a considerable more amount of alcohol than those with dark eyes.

Read more at http://www.omg-facts.com/Science/Blue-eyed-people-tend-to-have-a-higher-a/56550#iyLe4BYuXhSVdUEG.99