Gin! North Carolina again finds the G-spot

on 21/03/12 at 9:36 am

Spirits

In the English-speaking world, the history of alcoholic spirits has been perpetually caught up in taxes and government control. This has been true in North Carolina, but here, societal and religious concerns have played a part as well.

In the past two decades, however, tobacco lands have yielded to viniferous grapes, and today North Carolina wine has an annual economic impact of $1.28 billion and supports nearly 7,600 jobs. The popularity of local microbreweries is also soaring.

Now, adventurous entrepreneurs are distilling alcohol. The Distilled Spirits Council of the U.S. (DISCUS) indicates that the number of craft distilleries in 2000 was only two dozen nationwide. Today, there are more than 270, and that number is growing.

Currently, North Carolina has a handful of distillers. Piedmont Distillers in Madison, N.C., produces a triple distilled moonshine (see our article “Moonshine comes of legal age,” Aug. 16, 2011); Carolina Distillery in Lenoir, N.C., crafts an apple brandy from local pink lady apples; Troy & Sons Distillers in Asheville, N.C., is producing a white whiskey from Crooked Creek heirloom corn; Blue Ridge Distilling Co. in Golden Valley, N.C., received federal permits in February and plans to produce single malt vodka, whisky, gin and seasonal brandies; and Voardslab Distilling in Benson, N.C., is under construction but plans to produce whiskey.

FULL STORY

Enhanced by Zemanta