The Rebirth Of Rye Whiskey & Nostalgia For ‘The Good Stuff’

on 03/01/13 at 2:49 pm

Spirits

imagesIt used to be said that only old men drink rye, sitting alone down at the end of the bar, but that’s no longer the case as bartenders and patrons set aside the gins and the vodkas and rediscover the pleasures of one of America’s old-fashioned favorites.

Whiskey from rye grain was what most distilleries made before Prohibition. Then, after repeal in 1933, bourbon, made from corn, became more popular. Corn was easier to grow, and the taste was sweeter.

To be sure, rye whiskey production is only a drop compared with the rivers of bourbon produced now, although rye whiskey sales have tripled in the past five years.

You can even find rye in the tiny farm town of Templeton, Iowa. It’s said to be the same taste as the bootleg brew that Templeton was known for during Prohibition. They called it “The Good Stuff.” It was popular in Chicago, a favorite of Al Capone. Templeton Rye, legal these days, and sold in Iowa and 11 other states, is made from a grandfather’s secret recipe. The actual production, though, takes place at a distillery in Shelbyville, Ind., with the aged whiskey shipped to Templeton for bottling.

FULL STORY via NPR