Decanting Wine In A Blender. You Heard Right.

on 30/10/13 at 8:50 am

Wine

indexDon’t blame me. Blame Nathan Myhrvold.

Last year, the chef and former Microsoft chief technology officer released “Modernist Cuisine at Home” (The Cooking Lab; $140; 456 pages), a scientific cooking tome that teaches intrepid home cooks to emulsify and sous vide in the comfort of their own kitchens.

In it, Myhrvold declares that the best way to decant even a prized or aged wine is to whip it with an immersion blender for 30 to 60 seconds. Myhrvold calls it hyperdecanting, and up until recently, even the thought made me shudder.

The ritual of decanting wine has been around since Roman times, when early sommeliers discovered that the best way to avoid sipping sludge was to pour the bottle’s clean wine into another vessel, leaving the sediment behind.

Sediment isn’t as much of an issue anymore, at least for today’s average drinker, who tends to consume commercial wines that have been fined and filtered, or cleared of sediment.

Still, most experts agree that exposing wine to air before serving unleashes and improves its aromas and flavors. In the case of big or tight young reds, it can also mellow the tannins, making it taste like it has some age on it — or cost more than you paid.

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