Goodbye Cork? Wineries Try New Plant-Based Closure

on 21/05/13 at 10:17 am

Wine

imagesI just want to say one word to you. Just one word. Are you listening?

Bioplastics.

If you were remaking The Graduate in wine country this decade, there might be a great future in bioplastics. When organic, biodynamic and sustainable vintners look to bring their low-impact philosophies to their packaging, they often end up torn over what to do about closures.

Cork is the traditional choice, and it is a renewable material, unlike the alternatives: screw caps are made from mined metals, while synthetic corks are typically derived from petrochemicals. On the other hand, if some of your wine ends up flawed because even a small percentage of corks fail, that’s outright waste—not exactly a sustainable practice either.

In late April, alternative-cork manufacturer Nomacorc unveiled a new type of closure—made from renewable polymers derived from sugar cane. The company is touting the line, called the Select Bio Series, as 100 percent recyclable, with a net zero carbon footprint. Like the original Select Series, it gives winemakers a choice of different oxygen transfer rates to prevent flaws fromoxidation or reduction in certain types of wines.

 

FULL STORY via Wine Spectator